Quick Answer: Why Use Past Perfect Instead Of Past Simple?

How do you use have had in one sentence?

We use have had in the present perfect when the main verb is also “have”:I’m not feeling well.

I have had a headache all day.She has had three children in the past five years.We have had some problems with our computer systems recently.He has had two surgeries on his back..

Can you use past and present tense in the same sentence?

It’s fine to use the present and the past here. After all, that’s what happens: as you say, you paid the deposit in the past and pay the rent in the present. Tenses should agree in the same clause, but it’s very common to have multiple tenses in the same sentence.

Can we use past simple instead of Past Perfect?

These two tenses are both used to talk about things that happened in the past. However we use past perfect to talk about something that happened before another action in the past, which is usually expressed by the past simple. For example: “I had already eaten my dinner when he called.”

Is Past Perfect necessary?

The past perfect is not necessary if we are not ‘going back’ to the earlier past, and simply moving from one event to another. If the sequence is clear, the past perfect is not needed. The past perfect is optional only when talking about an action at a specific time.

What is past perfect example?

Some examples of the past perfect tense can be seen in the following sentences: Had met: She had met him before the party. Had left: The plane had left by the time I got to the airport. Had written: I had written the email before he apologized.

Can we use Past Perfect alone?

The past perfect tense describes an action that was completed before a point in the past. For example: I had eaten three hamburgers before breakfast. … Both of these tenses can be used independently.

Has been or had been?

“Has been” and “have been” are both in the present perfect tense. “Has been” is used in the third-person singular and “have been” is used for first- and second-person singular and all plural uses. … “Had been” is the past perfect tense and is used in all cases, singular and plural.

How do you use past simple and past perfect?

We use Simple Past if we give past events in the order in which they occured. However, when we look back from a certain time in the past to tell what had happened before, we use Past Perfect.

What are the past tenses in English?

English uses three principal forms of the past, the Simple Past (or preterite), the Present Perfect (or compound past), and the Past perfect, sometimes called the Pluperfect. All of these forms can also be used with a progressive aspect.

What is the difference between past perfect and past participle?

Past participle is a form of a verb like done, written, played etc. It is used in many situations like perfect tenses, passive voice etc. Past Perfect is a tense used to indicate that from two events in the past one occured before another.

What is past perfect continuous tense?

The past perfect continuous tense (also known as the past perfect progressive tense) shows that an action that started in the past continued up until another time in the past. The past perfect continuous tense is constructed using had been + the verb’s present participle (root + -ing).

What is the difference between the use of simple past and present perfect?

Use the simple past when the action started in the past, finished in the past, and is not continuing now. Use the present perfect when the action started in the past and is continuing now. The simple past tells us that an action happened at a certain time in the past, and is not continuing anymore.

Can we use yesterday with Past Perfect?

You cannot use an adverb or an adverbial phrase of past time in a past perfect sentence such as “yesterday,” “two weeks ago,” and “last year,” but you can use them if you put “by,” “till/until,” or “before” in front of them (e.g. “by yesterday,” “until last week”)?

Is Present Perfect a past tense?

The present perfect tense refers to an action or state that either occurred at an indefinite time in the past (e.g., we have talked before) or began in the past and continued to the present time (e.g., he has grown impatient over the last hour). This tense is formed by have/has + the past participle.

How do you teach present perfect and past simple?

When using the Present Perfect you should call the students’ attention to the consequences generated by an action, rather than just the action itself. The tense is always formed by conjugating the auxiliary verb ‘to have’ and then appending the verb’s past participle form.